An analysis of the curse of the oyster in the pearl novel by john steinbeck

First, there is, as was just suggested, the beauty and power of the narrative itself. One need go no further than simply noting the power, the restraint, and the beauty with which Steinbeck narrates this simple story. The entire book rings with authenticity.

An analysis of the curse of the oyster in the pearl novel by john steinbeck

SparkNotes: The Pearl: Plot Overview

Their lives seem rather peaceful, but their tranquility is threatened when a scorpion bites Coyotito. Juana tells Kino to go to town and get the doctor, but Kino and their neighbors tell Juana that the doctor will never come to where they live, so Juana decides to take matters into her own hands and sets off with Coyotito to the doctor.

Kino accompanies Juana, and many members of the village follow them to see what will happen. As Kino is collecting oysters on the ocean bottom, he spots a larger-than-usual oyster, collects it, and returns to the canoe.

Kino is immensely happy about both the pearl and Coyotito and yells loudly enough that he attracts the attention of the other oyster divers, who race toward his canoe. Before Kino reaches home with his great pearl, the news of his discovery has already reached his village and the town.

Everyone fantasizes what he or she would do with the wealth that the pearl represents, including the doctor, who previously refused to help Coyotito but now says that the baby is a patient of his.

The doctor visits Kino and Juana and tricks them into allowing him to treat Coyotito even though Kino knows that Coyotito is already cured; in fact what the doctor has done is to make Coyotito sick so that the doctor can then cure the baby and get paid more.

Coyotito indeed does get sick, and the doctor returns and gives the baby a different medicine that "cures" the baby. When the doctor asks Kino for payment, Kino says that his plan is to sell the pearl the next day.

The doctor offers to keep the pearl for Kino, and Kino refuses the request, but the doctor tricks Kino into revealing where Kino has hidden the pearl.

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That night, Kino hears someone in the hut, draws his knife and strikes out at the figure and draws blood, but is hit over the head with a heavy object.

Juana senses that the pearl is evil and begs Kino to throw the pearl back into the sea, but Kino refuses, believing still that the pearl will give them better lives than they have.

On the day that Kino is to sell the pearl, the other divers do not go diving. Kino and Juana begin the trip to the pearl buyers, followed by the entire village. The first pearl buyer to whom Kino offers to sell the pearl offers Kino a small amount of money for the pearl, saying that the pearl is too big and no one else will buy it.

He sends word to the other pearl buyers in town to come to his office and appraise the pearl. Kino, realizing that the pearl buyers are working together to get the pearl for the least amount of money, says that he will go to the capital to sell his pearl.

The first pearl buyer raises his offer to buy the pearl, but it is too late; Kino leaves. That night, Kino hears noises outside the hut and goes outside to check on what is making the noise. He resolves to sell the pearl in the capital. Later, Juana rises in the dark, takes the pearl from the hut, and goes to the beach.

Kino follows her and catches up with her at the beach just as she is ready to throw the pearl into the water. He hits her and saves the pearl from going into the water, but he is then attacked by some figures he cannot identify. The pearl is knocked from his hands, but he is able to stab one of his assailants before he is knocked unconscious.

Juana regains consciousness and finds Kino lying unconscious, a dead stranger next to him. When Kino regain consciousness, Juana returns the pearl to him from where she found it lying behind a rock and tells him that they must flee the village because he has killed a man.The Pearl by John Steinbeck "In the town they tell the story of the great pearl - how it was found and how it was lost again.

They tell of Kino, the fisherman, and of his wife, Juana, and of the baby, Coyotito. The first pearl buyer to whom Kino offers to sell the pearl offers Kino a small amount of money for the pearl, saying that the pearl is too big and no one else will buy it.

He sends word to the other pearl buyers in town to come to his office and appraise the pearl. The Pearl by John Steinbeck In The Pearl by John Steinbeck, Kino, the main character, did not succeed in his dreams of a luxurious life.

There where many reasons why Kino did not succeed 2 / the pearl The Pearl by John Steinbeck. This book takes place in Mexico during the nineteen hundreds in . Further Study. Test your knowledge of The Pearl with our quizzes and study questions, or go further with essays on the context and background and links to the best resources around the web.

An analysis of the curse of the oyster in the pearl novel by john steinbeck

He angrily rebukes them and threatens to go to the capitol himself to sell the pearl. That night, assassins come to rob Kino. He is able to ward off the first attack.

An essay on the novel, "The Pearl" Good use of descriptions The Curse of the Oyster In The Pearl, by John Steinbech, evil transforms certain humble citizens into envious savages/5(1). Steinbeck originally conceived of The Pearl as a film, and you can definitely tell by reading it. You’ve got everything from camera pans to a . “The Pearl” is a novella written by the famous American author John Steinbeck and published in The story was originally published in an issue of ‘Woman’s Home Companion’ magazine and is the re-imagining of a Mexican folk tale that Steinbeck heard while traveling in La Paz, Mexico in

This attack, however, causes Juana to sense the evil of the pearl, and she steals it in an attempt to return it to the sea.

Kino chases her and then beats her and returns to the hut. “The Pearl” is a novella written by the famous American author John Steinbeck and published in The story was originally published in an issue of ‘Woman’s Home Companion’ magazine and is the re-imagining of a Mexican folk tale that Steinbeck heard while traveling in La Paz, Mexico in

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