Real courts vs fictional courts

I just wish that in their zeal, they could also see it.

Real courts vs fictional courts

In many ways Americans live vicariously through the experiences of fictional characters and believe themselves to learn many things from fictional characters.

There are many things that fictional accounts of lawyers, judges, and courts confuse or create simply to meet the needs of the fiction or make a specific point. Because the intricacies of the legal profession are not well known or explained in school or by the media, unfortunately, people often only have fictional accounts of the law to educate them.

The result, unfortunately, is that the majority of Americans have incorrect beliefs of the law, judges, courts, and the persons that interact with them.

Real courts vs fictional courts

One of the main differences between fictional portrayals of the court process and real court processes is how the trial is portrayed. In reality, trials are long, boring procedures where attorneys debate, present evidence, and ask questions that have legal value for the judge or jury to arrive at a decision CA.

Many things are said and many witnesses may be brought in to make statements CA. Only rarely in that process will anything exciting happen. If one were to believe the portrayal of the trial sequence, however, seems as if every minute is interesting or exciting.

Trials presented in movies such as My Cousin Vinny or To Kill a Mockingbird, although one is a comedy and one a drama, represent trials as a place where shocking facts are discovered and quick thinking attorneys make major differences in trial outcomes. Perry Mason and Legally Blonde misrepresent reality by showing brilliant defense attorneys suddenly presenting a witness Reality and Fiction: In reality, a trial is often long, involved, does not contain surprises and is not entertaining.

The discovery process assures that both the defense and the prosecution know every detail of what the opposing party will do and argue at trial Steinberg.

All witnesses are revealed. A trial is normally only a format for the parties to present evidence, make their arguments, make legal arguments, dispute statements or the validity of certain evidence, and, in short, create a record of the proceedings so that the jury, if there is one, or the judge, can come to a decision about the guilt or liability of the defendant and, if either party believes a legal error occurred, for there to be a legal basis for an appeal to be filed CA.

In many fictional portrayals much is made about the opposing roles of the defense and the prosecution. Each side is usually portrayed as all good or all bad. For example, in To Kill a Mockingbird the defense attorney, Atticus Finch, was portrayed as the perfect man.

He was fair, honorable, a good father, a good neighbor, and a man willing to do what was right even when his personal safety was threatened.

Although the prosecutor in that movie was never said to be a bad person, the fact that a case so obviously wrong, where the defendant was so clearly innocent, was prosecuted by this man instantly meant the prosecutor was a part of the unfair, unethical southern system of discrimination.

Both are expected to act legally and both have pressures on them that affect their work and who they are. Simply the side they represent does not alone affect the kind of person they are.

This means that if a defense attorney sees an opportunity for his client to be set free then he or she must use it because that is their job. It is the job of the prosecutor to assure the defense does not have those opportunities.

Again, this does not reflect on the quality of their character. The same thing can also be said about the defendant and the victim in a case.

Fictional portrayals often paint the victim and the defendant as being entirely innocent or entirely bad. In real life the victim and the defendant are not always so clearly identified as good or bad people. A classic example of this occurred in New York in where a white man named Bernard Goetz shot several black men on the New York City subway because he feared they were trying to rob him Nossiter.

Goetz was a man who had been known to utter racist slurs and the youths had been known to commit illegal actions. In that case, as so often happens, neither the victim nor the defendant seems perfectly good or altogether bad.

That, often, is the situation real life presents. About the only trial participants whose roles fiction seems to properly portray are those of bailiffs, court clerks, and court reporters.

Court reporters are traditionally almost never even Reality and Fiction: Court clerks, who normally operate and run much of the court procedures and processes, are also normally ignored. Only the bailiff, due to their ability to carry a gun in the court room are often portrayed as having any role AZ Sup.

Bailiffs normally, as in Twelve Angry Men, are shown as controlling the jury and keeping order in the court, which is their true role AZ Sup. Very little about the fictional portrayals of the American judicial system are accurate even though courtrooms are entirely open to the public.Courts Real vs Fiction Reality and Fiction: the True View 1 Reality and Fiction: the True View Americans rely a great deal on their entertainment to educate them about life.

In many ways Americans live vicariously through the experiences of fictional characters and believe themselves to learn many things from fictional characters. Fred Thompson vs. The UN's anti-self-defense campaign. Earlier this week, Sen. Fred Thompson wrote to Field & Stream magazine, criticizing the UN's campaign against the human right of self-defense.

The Thompson campaign touted the letter on its website, and the letter got a favorable reception among many pro-Second Amendment bloggers. The Thompson letter, including its quotation of the great.

The bottom line for our hypothetical example is that home ownership actually costs about $/month per $, So, for example, if you’re looking at living in a house valued at $,, you could assume that would cost you about 3 x $ or about $/month to own.

Real Courts vs Fictional Courts.

Communities — Voices and Insights - Washington Times

Topics: Judge, Law, Lawyer Pages: 3 ( words) Published: September 28, This essay will discuss the differences in the ‘real’ courtroom, versus the ‘fictional’ courtroom, which is the depiction most of us are exposed to.

In order to accurately compare the differences between the two different. Courts Real vs Fiction Reality and Fiction: the True View 1 Reality and Fiction: the True View Americans rely a great deal on their entertainment to educate them about life.

In many ways Americans live vicariously through the experiences of fictional characters and believe themselves to learn many things from fictional characters. The Scopes Trial, formally known as The State of Tennessee initiativeblog.com Thomas Scopes and commonly referred to as the Scopes Monkey Trial, was an American legal case in July in which a substitute high school teacher, John T.

Scopes, was accused of violating Tennessee's Butler Act, which had made it unlawful to teach human evolution in any state-funded school.

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